Awards Related to HIV and Aging

2019 HU CFAR Developmental Core Awardees
Dr. Figueroa
Understanding the effect of HIV on spending, utilization, and patient outcomes related to other chronic conditions among older U.S. adults
Dr. Sun
Electroencephalogram-Based Brain Age in People Living with HIV

Jose F. Figueroa, MD, MPH

Biography

Jose F. FigueroaAssistant Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School
Associate Physician, Brigham and Women's Hospital

Brigham and Women’s Hospital
Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

Jose F. Figueroa, MD, MPH is an Assistant Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School (HMS) and an Associate Physician at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. He received his medical degree from Harvard Medical School and his MPH from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health with a concentration in health policy. He completed his residency in Internal Medicine at BWH, where he now works as a Hospitalist and the Director of the BWH Residency Management & Leadership Pathway. Dr. Figueroa was also the 2017-2018 Burke Global Health Fellow at the Harvard Global Health Institute. His research focuses on understanding the effect of policies on high-cost and vulnerable populations, including racial and ethnic minorities, the frail elderly, and people with serious mental illness, and on the institutions that care for them.

Proposal and Abstract

Understanding the effect of HIV on spending, utilization, and patient outcomes related to other chronic conditions among older U.S. adults

Abstract: Life expectancy for people living with HIV has increased substantially in the modern age of antiretroviral therapy (ART). This growing older population living with HIV raises important questions regarding understanding the effect of aging on people with the disease and, importantly, the effect of the infection on the development and management of other chronic conditions. Therefore, the primary objective of this study is to assess how HIV affects older people in the Medicare population who have comorbid chronic conditions associated with aging and mental illness. Specifically, our aims are to 1) determine the association of HIV on excess spending and utilization related to other chronic diseases and mental illness, and 2) determine whether Medicare patients with HIV experience worse patient outcomes related to other chronic conditions compared to a matched group of patients without HIV. For both aims, we will use national Medicare administrative claims data. At the end of this study, we will have built a comprehensive national dataset that includes a detailed breakdown of spending, utilization, and outcomes for HIV patients in Medicare. 

Haoqi Sun, PhD

Biography

Haoqi Sun PhDPostdoc Research Fellow
Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital

Dr. Haoqi Sun obtained his PhD from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, in 2017. His major is applied artificial intelligence in brain signal processing. He is currently a postdoc research fellow in Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, as a mentee of Drs. M. Brandon Westover, Robert Thomas, Shibani Mukerji, and Gregory Robbins. His research has been focused on using computational methods, including statistical causal inference and deep learning, to measure and understand brain aging in neuroinfectious and neurological diseases.

Proposal and Abstract

Electroencephalogram-Based Brain Age in People Living with HIV

Abstract: People living with HIV (HIV+) are now extensively treated by antiretroviral therapy (ART) to suppress HIV and extend their lifespan. With the aging population, new concerns about whether HIV+ individuals have accelerated aging are rising. The broad goal of this project is to measure the effect of HIV-1 infection on brain aging. The specific hypothesis is that HIV accelerates brain aging as measured by the Brain Age Index (BAI). The specific aims are to first estimate the effect of HIV infection on BAI after adjusting for demographics and pre-existing disorders; then decompose the effect into those mediated through cardiovascular risk and efavirenz use. The results will 1) lead to a better understanding of the causal mechanisms between HIV and brain aging; (2) identify potential targets for clinical intervention; and (3) provide a practical biomarker of brain health for HIV+ patients.